Maker 101: Joinery Joining Wood

Maker 101 is geared towards people who are just getting started in making and DIY. These videos are meant to give you a high level overview of tools and techniques to help you get started in making your projects.

Use a laser light to line up the position of the holes to be drilled for the can lights. Drill the hole in a space where it can be connected to a joist. To see if the light placement is alright, push a coat hanger wire through the ceiling before cutting the hole. If the position is right, then the hole can be drilled with the Hole saw. Position the can light over the hole and then nail it to the joist. Nail the light braces to the joists.

In this episode, they talk about five common types of wood joinery; Doweling, Mitering, Dado Joints, using biscuit joiners, Pocket Hole

Build a Cedar Bird House for the Wren

Make 11 wood cuts:
1@9″(base)
2@8″(roof)
2@7″(gables front & back)
2@4 3/16″(sides)
Dowel rod@2 1/4″

Watch the video to find out how the house is put together.

Build a Classic Mailbox

This is a really nice looking mailbox with a newspaper slot under the box and a nicely gauged phinneal top. The entire mailbox is placed over a pressure treated 4 x 4 post that is set in gravel. The plywood is angled and the mitered corners are cut for biscuits and glued. Wstch the video to see how this beautiful mailbox is constructed

Build a Bridge for your GARDEN or CREEK

Have you got an undulating backyard, a spot you can’t use or do you simply want to beautify your yard? Well Rob can help you get over all three problems with a bridge. This is a fun DIY project with simple materials and 5 steps to creating a small masterpiece.

Pallet Compost Bin

Build this pallet compost bin in minutes! Turn those unwanted wooden pallets into something environmentally friendly, like a compost bin. This tutorial shows you how to build one in minutes.

Tip: You can attach your pallets together with zip ties or screws, screws will create a more sturdy bin, but zip ties are a good alternative that require no power tools.

Repairing Concrete Edges & Corners

Repair broken edges and corners on concrete steps, curbs, slabs and walls without the use of forms with QUIKRETE Quick-Setting Cement, along with QUIKRETE Acrylic Fortifier.

Project Instructions:
When working with cement-based products, always wear eye protection and waterproof gloves.

Step 1:
Clean the surface of the damaged area by removing any loose material such as dirt, oil, or grease and unsound or flaking concrete.

TIP: unsound or flaking concrete can be removed by using a hammer and chisel or with a masonry grinding disk and a portable drill.

Step 2:
Scrub and clean the surface of the repair area with a stiff bristle brush.

Step 3:
Thoroughly rinse the repair area after cleaning.

Step 4:
Mix the Quick-Setting Cement using a margin trowel by adding 5 parts Cement to 1 part QUIKRETE Acrylic Fortifier until a lump-free, putty consistency is achieved. It is important not to add more water or Acrylic Fortifier after the material has begun to set.

TIP: if the mix is too wet, add additional Quick-Setting Cement and mix thoroughly; if the mix is too dry, add small amounts of Acrylic Fortifier sparingly.

Step 5:
Dampen the repair area with enough water to saturate the surface (any standing water should be removed).

Step 6:
Use a masonry brush to apply a thin coating of the Quick-Setting Cement and Acrylic Fortifier mixture.

Step 7:
Using a margin trowel, press the cement into the repair area using firm trowel pressure.

Step 8:
Continue to build and sculpt the Quick-Setting Cement so that the surface of the repair is above the surrounding concrete.

Step 9:
In about 5 to 10 minutes once the patch has become thumbprint hard, use the edge of a margin trowel to mold and shape the repair to match the contour of the surrounding concrete.

Anchoring Handrails & Bolts in Concrete

Setting handrails, bolts or metal posts in existing concrete has never been easier with the help of QUIKRETE Anchoring Cement.

Project Instructions:
When working with cement-based products, always wear eye protection and waterproof gloves.

Step 1:
Create a hole with a masonry core drill that is at least 1 inch larger than the diameter of the railing or bolt; the hole should be from 2 inches to 4 inches deep.

TIP: by increasing the embedded depth of the post, the pull-out strength will increase.

Step 2:
Mix Anchoring Cement by adding about 5 parts Anchoring Cement to 1 part clean water.

TIP: QUIKRETE Anchoring Cement is a Rapid Setting material so mix only as much as can be used in about 10 minutes.

Step 3:
Use a margin trowel to thoroughly mix the material to a fluid consistency similar to syrup. Make sure that the mix is uniform and lump free. If the mix is too wet, add additional Anchoring Cement and mix thoroughly; if the mix is too dry, add small amounts of water sparingly.

TIP: for vertical applications, simply add less water and mix to a heavy putty consistency.

Step 4:
Prior to pouring the anchoring cement, remove any loose debris and dampen the hole, but do not leave standing water.

Step 5:
Slowly pour the Anchoring Cement into the hole around the post to a level slightly above the surface. (Anchoring Cement will reach over 4000 psi in 24 hours and can support heavy weight in just 2 hours.)

Permanent Repairs to Asphalt Potholes

Potholes can be permanently repaired with QUIKRETE Commercial Grade High Performance Blacktop Repair, providing a new driving surface.

Project Instructions:
When working with asphalt-based products, always wear eye protection and waterproof gloves.

Step 1:
Square the pothole edges as much as possible and pour the repair material into the hole (overfill the hole about 2 to 3 inches above the surrounding asphalt).

Step 2:
Consolidate and compact the Blacktop Repair with a tamper until a firm surface is achieved.

NOTE: to further compact the repair material, place a piece of plywood over the patch and slowly drive over the plywood with a vehicle tire.

Repairing Leaks in Concrete/Masonry

Cracks or breaks in concrete or masonry basement walls can turn into active water leaks. Repair leaks and prevent costly damage with the help of QUIKRETE Hydraulic Water-Stop.

Project Instructions:
When working with cement-based products, always wear eye protection and waterproof gloves.

Step 1: Using a masonry chisel, enlarge the crack to a minimum 3/4-inch width and then remove all loose material.

Step 2:
Squarely cut or undercut the edges of the crack. It is important not to create “v” shaped edges as the Hydraulic Water-Stop expands as it hardens.

Step 3:
Mix Hydraulic Water-Stop by adding about 4 to 4 1/2 parts Water-Stop cement to 1 part clean water.

Step 4:
Use a margin trowel to thoroughly mix the material to a heavy putty consistency, making sure that the mix is uniform and lump free. If the mix is too wet, add additional Water-Stop cement and mix thoroughly; if the mix is too dry, add small amounts of water sparingly.

NOTE:Hydraulic Water-Stop sets extremely fast, so do not mix any more material than can be used in 2-3 minutes.

Step 5:
Once a putty consistency is achieved, take a handful of Water-Stop in your gloved hand and begin to work the material into a ball.

Step 6:
Press the Water-Stop cement into the crack using heavy pressure and hold in place for several seconds.

Step 7:
After the material has become “thumbprint” hard, use a margin trowel to trim the patch to match the contour of the surrounding surface.

Step 8:
The Water-Stop repair can be painted after 7 days with a water-based latex paint.